Instagram hashtags, the death of net neutrality and a Netflix Christmas stunt more naughty than nice: The Week in Review

Mindset Digital
Mindset Digital // December 15, 2017

Our weekly roundup brings you a list of curated content in social, technology and Mindset Digital happenings from need-to-know to silly social trends.

Last week in social…

Instagram now lets you follow hashtags. Instagram took a page from Twitter when it rolled out the ability to follow #hashtags this week. Search for a topic you like or click on a hashtag in an Instagram post and follow away. A new page will open with the option to follow the hashtag. (via Engadget)

 

Maybe ignorance is bliss when it comes to user data, Netflix? First they went viral. Then came the backlash. Netflix thought they had a funny take to share on Twitter this week, asking the 53 people who streamed A Christmas Prince every day for the past 18 days who hurt them. But while the gag racked up nearly a half a million likes, it quickly prompted what felt like just as many angry thinkpieces reminding users that Netflix is creeping on them something fierce. Netflix should have taken note of the reaction Spotify received after they ran a similarly cheeky billboard campaign. (via TechCrunch)

Facebook is your new home for more faces. Tired of waiting for your favorite thing to get its own Snapchat Lens? Facebook has a solution: any outside developer can now build on their AR platform. (Snapchat will also be opening up lens creation to everyone, but the crazy popular selfie option will remain limited to marketers only for now.) Overall this seems like a mixed bag if we’re being honest: on the one hand, we might be in for some seriously weird masks to try out now that designers can go beyond strict corporate partnerships. On the other hand, don’t expect all the big social platforms to stop foisting AR on us anytime soon. (via Recode)

Last week in technology…

The FCC votes to repeal Obama-era rules on net neutrality. In a sweeping move of deregulation, the FCC voted this week to end Obama-era rules that preserved net neutrality and a free and open internet. Now, ISPs will have the ability to speed up service for certain apps or websites and slow it down for others, creating “Internet fast lanes” that consumers may have to purchase to enjoy. This may be why recent polling shows 83% of Americans oppose the move, including 3 out of 4 Republicans. One guess as to who does favor getting rid of net neutrality. (via The Verge)

Google Assistant comes to older Android phones running 5.0 and up. Google rolled out its popular Google Assistant on phones running the older 5.0 version of Android, a move that some say will cover up to almost 80 percent of active Android devices. The assistant originally launched on Google’s Pixel phones only, but has been making its way across the Googlesphere. (via Ars Technica)

Last week at Mindset Digital…

What were the three developments last week you needed to know about? Invest 90-seconds in our 3 Things to Start Your Week series:

Weiner Wears Knit Cap While Writing LinkedIn Makeovers… Mindset Digital’s Matt Weiner reportedly wore a wool winter hat hipster-style in the office this week while he worked on LinkedIn makeovers. Weiner may have been responding to low temperatures across the office, but ultimately abandoned the knit cap around 1 p.m. EST, in favor of his noise cancelling headphones.

Asked for comment, Weiner replied “I CAN’T HEAR WHAT YOU ARE SAYING. THESE ARE NOISE CANCELLING!”

Thank you, Internet!

We promise we’ll be less of a downer next week, but here’s a small ray of sunshine during these dark net neutrality days.

Right before the vote, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai released a tongue-in-cheek PSA filled with nods to viral internet sensations in an attempt to persuade consumers that the web wouldn’t be changing.

Well it turns out that viral internet stars tend to align with the 83% of people who support keeping net neutrality. And now one of them is threatening legal action for his work appearing in Pai’s video.

Not only has Pai managed to make a large majority of the country extremely mad at him for destroying the internet as we know it, but he has somehow resurrected the Harlem Shake in 2017. And you know what? We’re not even sure which is a worse crime.